400 Day Clock Instructions

Schatz Standard 400 Day Clock Instruction Sheet from 1959

Schatz, THE ORIGINAL 400 DAY CLOCK

Schatz Instruction Booklet Cover Schatz instructions, figure I

The clock and glass dome are very carefully packaged . . . remove from the top of the carton with extreme care to avoid damage. You will find the following clock parts:

CONTENTS

1. Clock
2. Glass cover
3. Pendulum
4. Envelope containing a) Instruction booklet, b) Key, c) Spare suspension wire

IMPORTANT

The cover of this clock is made of unbreakable glass. To clean off dust, etc. only use a very soft cloth or feather duster, thus avoiding scratches.

METHOD OF ASSEMBLY

1) Set the clock upon a level surface completely free from vibration.

2) There is a brass protruding tube located at the back of the clock through which passes a delicate suspension wire assembly (Figure I). The tube has two sections, the lower part (A) holds the suspension wire in position while the clock is in transit.

3) The lower section of the tube is held tight by a thumb screw (B). Loosen this screw and raise the lower part of the tube (A) upward as far as it will go, then tighten the thumb screw (B). The suspension wire assembly is now ready to receive the pendulum.

4) Take the pendulum and place the top of it over the suspension plate (C, figure I), located at the end of the suspension wire . . . be extremely careful not to bend the delicate suspension wire. Make certain that the bottom point of the pendulum hands directly over the cone of the brass cup, otherwise the clock is not level. Accurate leveling is accomplished by adjusting the leveling screws (K) protruding from the base of the clock.

5) When pendulum is stationary, rotate it slightly either to the right or left, approximately one half turn, then release.

6) HAND SETTING – The clock should be set to the proper time by moving the minute hand. Do not touch the hour hand as this moves automatically.

7) WINDING: -- Clock winding is a memorable anniversary for many families the world over. To some, New Year’s Day is ideal; others honor the date of anniversary of a wedding, birth, or special family occasion with this sentimental custom. For testing and regulating purposes, the clock has been one third wound before leaving the factory. To wind fully, give the spring 3 to 4 further turns with the key. Please turn anti-clockwise. Do not force the spring, wind only until you find that the key will not readily turn further. when fully wound, your Schatz clock requires no further winding for 400 days.

8) Carefully place the glass dome into position, covering the clock.

9) To prevent loss, keep instruction booklet and key under the base of clock.

TIME REGULATIONS

Schatz instructions, figure III

ALLOW CLOCK TO OPERATE 48 HOURS BEFORE ATTEMPTING TIME ADJUSTMENTS

10) the cup located on the base centers the pendulum . . .if the pendulum touches the side or bottom of the cup, the clock will not operate accurately: This indicates that the clock does not stand on a level surface. In such a case accurate leveling is accomplished by adjusting the leveling screws (K) protruding from base of clock, enabling pendulum to rotate freely and the clock to operate satisfactorily. The cup also prevents the pendulum from swinging too much when the clock is moved . . . thereby preventing damage to the glass dome or suspension wire.

11) On the top of the pendulum is a disc (figure III), on which numbers are engraved 1 – 16 and two arrows marked F-S. the small indicator hand (L) will be pointing to a number on the disc at which the clock was regulated before leaving the factory. Should you find it necessary to regulate the clock observe the number to which the indicator hand points. The distance between each number is equivalent to 1/2 minute in 24 hours + or -.
For example: If your clock loses two minutes per day (24 hours) and the indicator hand points to number 8 on the disc – move the disc on the direction of the arrow marked F until the indicator hand will point to the number 4.

PUTTING THE CLOCK IN BEAT

12) In some instances, the clock may be "out of beat": this should be rectified by an experienced clock-maker. This can be determined as follows:

Observe the lever and escape wheel through the two holes in the back plate. When the lever (pallet) leaves a tooth of the escape wheel, the pendulum must rotate a litter further. The pendulum will then rotate to the opposite side and will also rotate a little further after the lever leaves a tooth of the escape wheel. If the distance the pendulum travels is unequal at both ends of the rotation, the clock is "out of beat". To put the clock "in beat" the method is as follows: On the back plate is a bridge (D) under which a small round pillar is attached and held by screw (F). The suspension wire is held in place by a small bracket centered within this pillar. Screwed to the suspension wire at a slightly lower point is fork (E), which guides the lever. Loosen screw (F), turn the small pillar slightly, with the help of the protruding arm (G) in the direction that more rotation is wanted, to make it equal. Tighten screw (F).

Schatz instructions, figure II

SUSPENSION SPRING REPLACEMENT

In the event of breakage of the delicate suspension wire, which holds the pendulum, a spare has been included for your clockmaker to use if it should be necessary to replace the suspension wire. This is replaced in the following manner:

13) Take the pendulum off the suspension plate (C).

14) Remove thumb screw (B) of suspension wire protecting tube slide (A). Now remove the protecting tube slide.

15) Remove the suspension wire mounting bridge (D) with the attached suspension wire assembly by removing the two holding screws (I). Lift bridge and attached suspension wire assembly up and out of protecting tube. Remove the suspension wire assembly from the bridge by removing thumb screw (H).

16) Replace the suspension wire assembly on the clock, reversing the procedure of removal. Be sure that the fork (E) fits over lever.

17) Clock must be put "in beat" again, as explained in "Time Regulations", paragraph 12.

This Original Schatz 400 Day Clock with its graceful lines and silently rotating ball pendulum is a distinctive precision instrument that runs 400 days without rewinding. It has been accurately timed and approved before leaving the home of highly skilled Schatz craftsmen.




Schatz Miniature 400 Day Clock Instruction Sheet ca. 1955

Describes how to unlock the pendulum, and how to wind, start, set and regulate the clock. Also gives instructions on replacing the suspension spring.
Cover of Schatz Lantern 400 day clock instruction sheet Schatz lantern 400 day clock instructions Schatz lantern 400 day clock instructions Schatz miniature 400 day clock suspension spring replacement Photo of Schatz miniature 400 day clock Movement of Schatz miniature 400 day clock

Kundo 400 Day Clock Instruction Sheet ca. 1950

For the type of clock with removable pendulum (no pendulum locking device).

To wind this clock, put the key on the square and turn counterclockwise, 1/2 turn at a time. Release the key gently after each half-turn, don't let let it snap back suddenly.

1950 Kundo 400 Day Clock Instructions 1950 Kundo 400 Day Clock Instructions 1950 Kundo 400 Day Clock Instructions 1950 Kundo 400 Day Clock Instructions

Kundo 400 Day Clock Instruction Sheet ca. 1955

For the type of clock with pendulum locking device at the bottom rear of the movement.

To wind this clock, put the key on the square and turn counterclockwise, 1/2 turn at a time. Release the key gently after each half-turn, don't let let it snap back suddenly.

Kundo 1950 400 day clock instructions 1950 Kundo anniversary clock instructions 1950 Kundo 400 day anniversary clock instructions